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One More Reason for Fewer CRTs


While our whole visual field is about 180 degrees, the sensitive area of our retina is about 2 degrees. The functional range for utilizing visual information typically varies from 4 to 30 degrees. With stress, the visual field narrows. Recent research by Atuso Murata showed the funneling effect, in which increased foveal task complexity narrowed the functional visual field (Foveal Task Complexity and Visual Funneling, Human Factors, Vol. 46, No. 1, 2004, p135-141). The funneling effect results in longer response times to stimuli in the peripheral visual field. So the argument that more CRTs are needed in an upset, when the task complexity in the primary visual field will likely be its highest, runs counter to data on how people process information.

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